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Location Location: The Village of Gavalahori on the Greek Island of Crete

by Marquette Turner

in Features, Lifestyle, Location, Travel, Variety

Millions of villages throughout the world remain hidden gems until they receive media attention.

In this article, we want to bring your attention to Gavalahori, a tiny village on the Greek island of Crete.

Gavalohori is a peaceful, quaint and traditional Cretan village situated in the Apokorona region about 3km inland from the equally beautiful coastal fishing village of Almirida.

Gavalohori is an old historical village with approximately 500 residents but this number swells in the summer months as tourists, relatives and visitors arrive.

Its name comes from the noble Gavaladon family (who gained possession of the village during the diversion of Crete to the 12 young rulers of the Byzantium in 1182).

Many of the well-known Gavaliana walls still stand within a fantastic landscape.

A typical Cretan village with a small square where a coffee shop, a bakery, a mini mart, two tavernas and other convenience stores can be found.

Many hills, mainly wooded with olive trees and carobs, are scattered through Gavalohori. It is a wonderful experience for visitors to walk throughout the village and enjoy the peace and beauty of the surroundings.

Many interesting buildings exist, such as the 18th century two-roomed, arched olive oil press, the temples of Panagia and Agios Sergios, the old school, and the historical folk art museum.

Just 5km from tranquil Gavalohori one can drive to Almirida, a picturesque coastal village. You may dine there in one of several seaside tavernas or relax sipping your drink by a bar during sunset.

The climate is mild and enjoyable for all.

Marquette Turner Luxury Homes has a number of wonderful villas available for sale in Gavalahori, which can be viewed HERE.

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

CliffordWrightHoward February 12, 2010 at 6:44 am

This article is a real concern. Thankfully, you decided a keyboard a more appropriate career tool to a scalpel.

Wordiness is taking more words than necessary to make your point. It may take the form of redundant expressions or phrases. To be sure, longer expressions may be appropriate at times as a matter of style or to avoid ambiguity. But some business writers clutter their sentences and paragraphs with words, phrases, and expressions that needlessly distract the reader.

Consistent elimination of wordiness results in a stronger, more concise writing style that is easier to read and provides fewer opportunities for misinterpretation. In contrast, a wordy style makes reading laborious and, thus, encourages skimming and leads to inattention. Do you wish the reader to carefully consider your message? If so, reduce wordiness to the extent possible. The examples below provide guidance for avoiding general forms of wordiness.

Wordiness: (There are )millions of villages throughout the world (that) remain hidden gems until they receive media attention.

Wordiness: (It is) a typical Cretan village with a small square where a cofee shop, a bakery, a mini mart, two tavernas and other convenient stores can be found.

Wordiness double up paragraph with spelling mistake appears twice: It is a typical Cretan village with a small square where a cofee shop, a bakery, a mini mart, two tavernas and other convenient stores can be found.

In this article (comma) we want to bring your attention to Gavalahori, a tiny village on the Greek island of Crete.

A lot of (Many) interesting buildings can be seen, such as the 18th century two-roomed, arched olive oil press, the temples of Panagia and Agios Sergios, the old school, and the historical folk art museum

Within a short distance (5km) from tranquil Gavalohori(comma) one can drive to Almirida, a picturesque coastal village.

It is a typical Cretan village with a small square where a cofee(coffee) shop, a bakery, a mini mart, two tavernas and other convenient stores can be found.

Several narrow streets branch off its center (centre. I'm certain you Australians use this spelling )

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